Enos

 

A Covenant Plan of Salvation

      (2 Nephi--Enos)


 

 

 

     ENOS

 

Enos 1:2 And I will tell you . . . and . . . and . . . and . . . and . . . and . . . and (Illustration): Above are the first words of verses of the actual Hebrew text of 1 Kings 22. You see in the text at the beginning (reading Hebrew right to left) a vertical stroke (that looks like the number 7). As you can see, it is literally affixed to the verb conjugation that follows and results in the translation shown next to each verb. This same pattern is evident in the Book of Mormon. The book of Enos is a prime example of this unique Hebrew syntax. [James DuWors, "Hebraisms in the Book of Mormon," Book of Mormon Conference, 14-16 August 2001: The Twenty-Fifth Annual Church Education System Religious Educators Conference at Brigham Young University, p. 57]

 

Enos 1:4 All the day long I did cry unto him (Illustration): Enos Praying [Steven Lloyd Neal, Verse Markers, Book of Mormon, Vol. 1, p. 5]

Enos 1:4 And my soul hungered; and I kneeled down before my Maker (Illustration): Enos Praying. "And my soul hungered; and I kneeled down before my Maker, and I cried unto him in mighty prayer." Artist: Robert T. Barrett. [Thomas R. Valletta ed., The Book of Mormon for Latter-day Saint Families, 1999, p. 174]

Enos 1:20 I kneeled down before my Maker, and I cried unto him in mighty prayer (Illustration): Enos Praying. [The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Gospel Art, #305]

Enos 1:4 Their skill was in . . . the cimeter (Illustration): Sketch of a possible Mesoamerican scimitar. This figure clearly shows the structure of the weapon as being different from the standard ax. [William Hamblin and Brent Merrill, "Notes on the Cimeter (Scimitar) in the Book of Mormon," in Warfare in the Book of Mormon, F.A.R.M.S., p. 362]