You are here

Periodicals


 

Alan C. Miner

March 24, 2005

 

 

A Chronology of Thought on Book of Mormon Geography

 

A Selective List of Pertinent Periodicals (Chronological Order)

 

 

1832      The Evening and The Morning Star:      (1832-1834) Beginning in the early 1830s, the Church published several periodicals for the sake of informing the members and defending Church doctrines. The first of these was the Evening and the Morning Star (June 1832-June 1833) The Star was printed monthly and included the text of many of the revelations given to the Prophet Joseph Smith. Originally published in Independence, Missouri, this paper lasted 14 numbers (or issues) before an angry mob ordered its editor, W. W. Phelps, to discontinue publication. When he refused they destroyed the press. The periodical's headquarters were then moved to Kirtland, Ohio, where an additional 10 numbers (December 1833-September 1834) were produced, edited by Oliver Cowdery. In October 1834 The Latter Day Saints' Messenger and Advocate began as a continuation of the Star. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

 

1832      Upper Missouri Advertiser:      (1832-1833) Aside from many of the early doctrine-oriented periodicals, the communities of the Church produced several papers that were, more or less, secular journals. Important among these were the Upper Missouri Advertiser, edited by W. W. Phelps, in Independence from 1832 until 1833. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1) The Advertiser was a weekly single-sheet paper intended for the community.

 

1834      The Latter Day Saints Messenger and Advocate:      (1834-1837) In October 1834 The Latter Day Saints Messenger and Advocate began as a continuation of the Evening and Morning Star. It was published in Kirtland and edited by Oliver Cowdery (two different times), John Whitmer, and Warren A Cowdery before it was suspended in September 1837. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

 

1835      Evening and Morning Star:      (1835-1836) Between January 1835 and October 1836, all 24 numbers of The Evening and the Morning Star were edited and reprinted under the abbreviated name Evening and Morning Star at Kirtland. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1835      Northern Times:      (1835) Aside from many of the early doctrine-oriented periodicals, the communities of the Church produced several papers that were, more or less, secular journals. Important among these were the Northern Times, edited by Frederick G. Williams in Kirtland during 1835. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

 

1837      The Elders' Journal:      (1837-1838) "Elders' Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. This periodical succeeded the Messenger and Advocate in 1837. Edited by Joseph Smith Jr. and published by Thomas B. Marsh, two numbers (October and November) appeared in Kirtland before the press was destroyed by fire. Numbers 3 and 4 appeared in July and August 1838 at Far West, Missouri. Forced to flee Far West, the Saints buried the type in a Church member's backyard until the following spring, when it was taken to Illinois and used for publishing The Times and Seasons. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1839      Times and Seasons:      (1839-1846) This periodical was published in Nauvoo from November 1839 until February 1846. The first year it was published monthly, and then semi-Monthly until 1846. It parallels the history of the Church at Nauvoo. Ebenezer Robinson, who had, along with Don Carlos Smith, first published the paper, reluctantly sold it to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles after they expressed an interest in it during November and December 1841. After this, The Times was edited by Joseph Smith and John Taylor. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

 

1840      Latter Day Saints' Millennial Star:      (1840-1970) During the last half of the nineteenth century, the Church allowed or caused its leaders to establish several periodicals to serve the needs of members in various missions. The purpose of these periodicals was to share with the Saints living in peripheral areas information, doctrine, and sermons readily available to those residing nearer the center of the Church. The first of the mission periodicals, and the only international one published during Joseph Smith's life, was the Millennial Star. Established by the Quorum of the Twelve on their mission to Great Britain in 1840, this periodical contributed to the conversion of more than 5,000 people in a year's time. It was edited first by Parley P. Pratt (1840-1842) except for a brief period when he traveled to visit America and left the editing responsibilites in the hands of Willard Richards and Brigham Young; after him each British Mission president acted as editor until the periodical was discontinued in 1970. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1) It was published in Manchester, Liverpool and London, England. First issued for the fast-growing British membership, it later served American Saints as the most substantial Church periodical between their Nauvoo exodus in 1846 and the commencement of the weekly newspaper Deseret News in 1850. From 1850 to 1971 it continued as a substantial missionary periodical read worldwide. It was edited by Orson Pratt (1848-1851) and George Q. Cannon (1860-1864)

 

1841      The Gospel Reflector      Was Benjamin Winchester the editor? Where did this originate?

 

 

1842      The Wasp:      (1842-1843) Aside from many of the early doctrine-oriented periodicals, the communities of the Church produced several papers that were, more or less, secular journals. Important among these were the Wasp, published weekly in Nauvoo from April 1842 until April 1843. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1843      Nauvoo Neighbor:      (1843-1846) This secular paper was a continuation of the Wasp, edited by William Smith and John Taylor from 1843 until 1846. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1844      Prophet:      (1844-1845) During the last half of the nineteenth century, the Church allowed or caused its leaders to establish several periodicals to serve the needs of members in various missions. The purpose of these periodicals was to share with the Saints living in peripheral areas information, doctrine, and sermons readily available to those residing nearer the center of the Church. A few early periodicals served specific missions in the United States. In New York City during 1844 and 1845, the Prophet was edited by Parley P. Pratt, Samuel Brannan, and William Smith. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1846      Prophwyd y Jubili:      (1846-1848) As the Church expanded into other lands, its missions often established periodicals in their respective languages. The earliest was the Welsh Prophwyd y Jubili.

 

1846      Voree Herald:      (1846) (Strangite) This paper was published monthly by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite) from Voree, Wisconsin Territory. Volume 1 was started in January of 1846 and ran through October, 1846 when the name of the paper was changed to Zion's Reveille..

 

1846      Star in the East:      (1846- ????) (Strangite) A Strangite periodical

 

 

1846      Zion's Reveille:            (1846-1847) (Strangite) This paper was published twice a month and then weekly by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite) from Voree, Wisconsin Territory. Volume 1 was started in November, 1846. Editors were John Greenbow (Dec. 1846), James J. Strang (April, 1847). In September 23, 1847 the name was changed to Gospel Herald.

 

1847      Gospel Herald:      (1847-1850) (Strangite) This periodical was a continuation of Zion's Reveille and published weekly. It was still edited by James J. Strang. On August 30, 1849 it appears that Francis Cooper took over at least some of the operation of the paper. The last issue was in June, 1850.

 

1850      Deseret News:      (1850- Present) The longest running of any Church-related publications and by far the largest of the Church's secular periodicals, the Deseret News was established in 1850 in Salt Lake City and is one of the most important newspapers in the Intermountain West. Among its editors have been three apostles: Willard Richards, George Q. Cannon, and Charles W. Penrose. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1) In the fall of 1867, by the appointment of President Brigham Young, George Q. Cannon took charge of the "Deseret News" and issued a daily edition this being the commencement of the "Deseret Evening News." For a number of years he continued to occupy the position of editor and publisher of the "Deseret News" traveling as circumstances would permit, with the First Presidency and the Twelve. In 1892 the Deseret News was leased to the private company of George Q. Cannon Sons, operating as the Deseret News Publishing Company. This arrangement came to an end in 1899 when the Church took back control.

 

 

1850      L'Etoile du Deseret.      (1850) In 1849 John Taylor was called on a mission to France. He arrived in 1850. While there he edited and published a monthly paper called "L'Etoile du Deseret.

 

 

1851      Zions Panier(1851)      In 1849 John Taylor was called on a mission to France. He arrived in 1850. After a time he extended his preaching of the Gospel into Germany. There in Hamburg he published a periodical entitled "Zions Panier."

 

1851      Skakndinaviens Stjerne      (1851-1956) As the Church expanded into other lands, its missions often established periodicals in their respective languages. The longest running was this Danish periodical.

 

1853      The Seer      (1853-1854) Soon after the Church formally announced the practice of plural marriage, Brigham Young appointed several men to go to various cities to establish periodicals to respond to antipolygamy polemic. These periodicals all affirmed the notions that "it is better to represent ourselves than to be represented by others" (quote in Garr, 32). The Seer was edited by Orson Pratt and published from 1853 to 1854 in both Washington, D. C. and Liverpool, England. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1854      St. Louis Luminary:      (1854-1855) The Seer was followed by another polemic periodical called the St Louis Luminary (November 1854-December 1855), established by Erastus Snow. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

 

1854      Journal of Discourses:      (1854-1886) During the last half of the nineteenth century, the Church allowed or caused its leaders to establish several periodicals to serve the needs of members in various missions. The purpose of these periodicals was to share with the Saints living in peripheral areas doctrine and sermons readily available to those residing nearer the center of the Church. Based in Great Britain, The Journal of Discourses was published as a periodical in Liverpool to share general authorities' sermons given in Utah with British and European members.

 

1855      The Mormon:      (1855-????) The polemic periodical Mormon was founded by John Taylor in New York City in February 1855. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)      

 

1856      The Western Standard:      This polemic periodical was established in San Francisco and edited by George Q. Cannon, beginning in February 1856. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1856      Daily Northern Islander      (1856) (Strangites) A daily added to the Weekly Northern Islander. It began on April 1, 1856 and ended on June 20, 1856 because of the death of James J. Strang.

 

1860      The True Latter Day Saints' Herald:      (1860-1877) (RLDS) This was a publication of the Reorganized Church. It was apparently first published in Cincinnati, Ohio, but later published in Plano, Illinois and was edited by Joseph Smith III. VERIFY & FINISH

 

1860      Church Printing Office (England):      In October, 1860, George Q. Cannon was appointed to preside over the European Mission. The duties assigned him by the First Presidency were to take charge of the "Millennial Star" and the publishing business connected therewith and with emigration. He reached Liverpool on December 21, 1860. Soon after his arrival he established a Church printing office, the printing for the Church up to that time having been done by contract with other offices.

 

 

1864      The Truth Teller      (1864, 1868-1896?) (Church of Christ) periodical. Volume 1 began in July of 1864, and continued for one year. It was published in Illinois. Volume 2, number 1 was delayed until June of 1868-presumably interrupted while the Saints were relocating in Independence. It was later replaced by the Searchlight, which was published in 1896, after many years of no church paper.

           

1866      George Q. Cannon and Sons:      With the establishment of George Q. Cannon And Sons in 1866, the modern LDS publishing and bookstore business really began. This and other companies combined in 1919 to form Deseret Book Company.

 

1866      Juvenile Instructor:      (1866-1930) After returning home in 1864 from England where he had presided over the European Mission and established a Church publishing office, George Q. Cannon became interested in the education of the young people in the Church. In January, 1866 he commenced the publication of the "Juvenile Instructor" designed expressly for the education and elevation of the young. At the organization of the Sunday School Union in 1867, he was made general superintendent, which position he held till the last day of his earthly career.The Juvenile Instructor, established and edited by George Q. Cannon in Salt Lake City, Utah was bought by the Sunday School in 1901 and became their official organ. In early 1900 George Reynolds had spoken in favor of the Deseret Sunday School Union purchasing the Juvenile Instructor and using it as the official publication of the Union. The idea was accepted. By year's end the deal was concluded, and Cannon, who remained as editor of the publication named George Reynolds, "the devoted Sunday School worker and warm personal friend," as the assistant editor. As the Sunday School added more adult classes, the scope of this periodical also changed, and in 1930 its name was changed to, simply, the Instructor. George Q. CAnnon was editor of the Juvenile Instructor from 1867 to 1901. In 1901 we find the following: "Editors: George Q. Cannon, Lorenzo Snow, Joseph F. Smith; Assistant Editors: George Reynolds, Joseph M. Tanner. From 1903 Joseph F. Smith became editor, with George Reynolds and J. M. Tanner assistant editors until 1907. After 1909 no editors appeared on the title page.

 

 

 

*1867      Deseret Evening News:      (1867- ) In the fall of 1867, by the appointment of President Brigham Young, George Q. Cannon took charge of the "Deseret News" in Salt Lake City and issued a daily edition this being the commencement of the "Deseret Evening News."

 

1869      Der Stern      (1869-- ) As the Church expanded into other lands, its missions often established periodicals in their respective languages. One early journal was Der Stern

 

 

1872      Woman's Exponent:      During the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the various auxiliaries of the Church began printing their own materials. Generally the periodicals were first edited and published by private individuals in behalf of the auxiliaries, then taken over by the auxiliaries themselves. The first of these was the Woman's Exponent (1872-1914), (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1877      Nordstjrnan      (1877-- ) As the Church expanded into other lands, its missions often established periodicals in their respective languages. One early journal was the Swedish Nordstijrnan

 

 

 

1877      The Saints Herald:      (1877-2002) (RLDS) This is a Reorganized Church publication. Apparently published in Independence, Missouri as a semi-monthly paper. FINISH

 

1877      The Amateur      (1877-1879) This periodical was published in Ogden, Utah by the Office of Ogden Junction. November, 1877-July 15, 1879? 2v. weekly, semi-monthly. It was the official organ of the Mutual Improvement Association of Weber County and the predecessor of the Contributor.

 

 

1879      The Contributor:      (1879-1896) This periodical was originally edited by Junius F. Wells and published in Salt Lake City (Ogden, Utah ?) by the Contributor Company for the Young Men's and Young Women's Mutual Improvement Association. In 1897 it was replaced by the Improvement Era. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

*1888      The Deseret Weekly:      (1888-1898) For a time the Deseret News was published as a daily, a semi-weekly, and a weekly newspaper.

 

1888      Autumn Leaves(1888-1928) (RLDS) periodical for youth. Published in Lamoni, Iowa. It was continued by Vision: a magazine for youth 1929-1932

 

1889      Young Woman's Journal:      (1889-1929) This periodical was originally published by Susa Young Gates for the Young Women's auxiliary as a literary outlet. It was slowly merged with the Improvement Era. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1) It was later presented to the Young Women's Mutual Improvement Association.

 

1889?      Zion's Ensign      1889??---1932??? (RLDS) newpaper printed in Independence, MO. Hyrum O. Smith was the editor to begin with.

 

 

 

1890      The Utah Monthly Magazine:      (1890-1895) It was published by Magazine Publishing Company in Salt Lake City.

 

 

1896      The Searchlight      (1896-1900) (Church of Christ) periodical. Replaced the Truth Teller. It was first published in 1896 and continued until March, 1900.

 

1896      De Ster      (1896-- ) As the Church expanded into other lands, its missions often established periodicals in their respective languages. One early journal was the Dutch De Ster.

 

 

     

1897      Improvement Era:      (1897-1970) The Improvement Era began as a replacement for The Contributor, published by the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association coupled with a slow merging with the Young Woman's Journal, so that by 1930 it became the sole periodical not just for the young men & women of the Church, but more and more for adults. It became the "voice of the Church." In 1971 it was replaced by the Ensign and the New Era.

 

 

1900      The Evening and Morning Star      (1900-1916) (Church of Christ) monthly periodical. John R. Haldeman editor.

 

 

1901      Deseret News Bookstore:      After the death of George Q. Cannon in 1901, the George Q. Cannon and Sons Company was purchased by the Church's Deseret News and renamed the Deseret News Bookstore. Meanwhile, the Church Sunday school organization began publishing its own lesson manuals and supplementary instructional materials in the early 1870s and later included book publishing and a retail bookstore. The two companies were merged in 1919 and subsequently named the Deseret Book Company. (Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. by Daniel H. Ludlow, New York: Macmillan, 1992, p. 374.)

 

1902      Children's Friend:      (1902-1970) From 1902 until 1970, the Children's Friend served as the official Primary organ.

 

1903      The Elders' Journal:      1903-1907 A few periodicals served specific missions in the United States. The Elders' Journal (not to be confused with the 1837 periodical of the same name) was established in 1903 In Chattanooga, Tennessee to serve the Southern States Mission. In 1907 it merged with the recently established Liahona as Liahona the Elders' Journal. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

 

 

 

1907      Liahona the Elders' Journal:      (1907-1945) In 1907 the Elders' Journal merged with the recently established Liahona, a multimission publication printed by the Central States Mission, under the title Liahona the Elders' Journal. it was modeled after its Great Britain counterpart, the Millennial Star. This new periodical served all North American missions. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1) It was published in Independence.

 

 

1907?--      Journal of History      (RLDS) quarterly publication

 

1910      Utah Genealogical and Historical magazine:      (1910-1940)

     

 

1914      Relief Society Magazine:      (1914-1970) In 1914, the Woman's Exponent was replaced by the Relief Society Magazine in disseminating information to the women of the Church. Titled the Relief Society Bulletin for its first year of publication, by the time it was discontinued in 1970 the Relief Society Magazine had the largest circulations of any auxiliary Church periodical.

 

1919      Deseret Book Company:      In 1919 the Deseret News Bookstore and other companies combined to form Deseret Book Company, which dominated the Latter-day Saint market during most of the twentieth century as the largest LDS publisher and bookstore chain in North America.

 

1922      Zion's Advocate      (1922----> Present) (Church of Christ) periodical. Started on May 15, 1922.

     

 

1929      Vision: a magazine for youth      (1929-1932) (RLDS) Published by the RLDS Church in Independence, Missouri. In 1933 it was absored by the Saints Herald in Independence.

 

 

1930      Instructor:      (1930-1971) In 1930 the name of the Juvenile Instructor was shortened to the Instructor. In 1971, under the direct supervision of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve, all auxiliary periodicals were consolidated into three periodicals published by the Church.

 

 

1931      Church News:      (1931- Present) Beginning in 1931 the Deseret News contained a supplement titled the Church News, with the purpose of updating Church members on the activities of the growing Church. This supplement was also sent out separately to members worldwide. (Encyclopedia of Latter-day Saint History-1)

 

1942      Bookcraft:      In 1942 John K. Orton established Bookcraft, which soon became the second largest LDS publisher.

 

 

1949      UAS Newsletter:      (1949-1961) The University Archaeological Society (UAS) was founded in Provo, Utah on the BYU campus on April 18, 1949, as a result of suggestions by Dr. John A. Widtsoe, a long-time advocate of its field of study among Latter-day Saints. The Society was created as an adjunct or affiliate of the Department of Archaeology and was considered to be a continuation of the old Itza Society founded at Los Angeles, California, in 1938. They used Department people, facilities and supplies to further research and publication. Wells Jakeman became the first chairman, succeeded by Ross Christensen. In 1961 SEHA was formed in place of UAS.

 

 

1959      BYU Studies:      (1959-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. Among these, several were published by Brigham Young University and its dependents, such as BYU Studies.

 

 

1961      SEHA Newsletter:      (1961-1988) The Society for Early Historic Archaeology was formed in place of the University Archaeology Society in 1961 but was registered with the State of Utah rather than being part of BYU.

 

 

1963      The Liahona:      Over the years, the Book of Mormon term Liahona has been used as the title for several Latter-day Saint publications. From 1963 to 1971 the Indian Committee of the Church published a periodical known as The Liahona for American Indians.

 

 

1966      Dialogue:      (1966-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. One of these was Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought which sought an unbiased viewpoint.

 

 

1971      Ensign:      (1971-Present) In 1971, under the direct supervision of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve, all auxiliary periodicals were consolidated into three periodicals published by the Church. The Ensign was established for adults (18 and older).

 

 

1971      New Era:      (1971-Present) In 1971, under the direct supervision of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve, all auxiliary periodicals were consolidated into three periodicals published by the Church. The New Era was established for youth (12 to 17).

 

1971      Friend:      (1971-Present) In 1971, under the direct supervision of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve, all auxiliary periodicals were consolidated into three periodicals published by the Church. The Friend was established for children (11 and under).

 

 

1974      Journal of Mormon History:      (1974-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. One of these was from the Mormon History Association's Journal of Mormon History presenting scholarly treatments of historical topics.

 

1975      Sunstone:      (1975-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. One of these was Sunstone dedicated to an intellectual representation of differing viewpoints.

 

1980?      Insights:      (1980-Present) FARMS began to disseminate information about the Book of Mormon with their periodical newsletter

 

 

1981      Signature Books:      Signature Books was established as a publisher of LDS works.

 

 

1981      JWHA Journal:      (1981-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. One of these was the John Whitmer Historical Association Journal with a core interest in Reorganized Latter Day Saint history.

 

1988      AAF Newsletter:      (1988-present) In 1988 SEHA affiliated itself with Ancient America Foundation led by Rick Hauck and T. Michael Smith.

 

 

1989      Nauvoo Journal:      (1989-1999) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. One of these was from the Mormon Historic Sites Foundation which published Nauvoo Journal beginning in 1989 through 1999. In 1999 the name was changed to Mormon Historical Studies. The primary interest of this periodical was the nineteenth-century Latter-day Saint experience.

 

 

1991      Book of Mormon Archaeological Digest            (1991, 1997-2003, 2005 - present) Joseph Allen

                                          editor.

 

 

1992      Journal of Book of Mormon Studies:      (1992-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. Among these, several were affiliated with Brigham Young University and its dependents, such as Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies which published Journal of Book of Mormon Studies.

 

1993      Liahona:      Over the years, the Book of Mormon term Liahona has been used as the title for several Latter-day Saint publications. Since June 1993, all new language editions of the Church's international magazine have been titled Liahona, beginning with Russian, Czech, and Hungarian. In January 1999 and January 2000, the titles of all remaining non-English language editions were changed to Liahona.

 

 

1999      Mormon Historical Studies:      (1999-Present) In 1999 the Mormon Historic Sites Foundation changed the name of its publication from the Nauvoo Journal to Mormon Historical Studies.

 

 

2000      Religious Educator:      (2000-Present) During the last half of the twentieth century, several scholarly non-Church sponsored periodicals and journals dealing with LDS topics emerged. Among these, several were published by Brigham Young University and its dependents, such as the Religious Studies Center which published Religious Educator

 

 

J. H. Parry & sons

The Contributor Company, 1889.

Herald House Publishing

 

TRACE THE OWNERSHIP AND EDITORSHIP OF THE COMPANIES AND THE PERIODICALS

Zarahemla Record

The Witness

B of Mormon Foundation